art

#SupportYourLocal: Artists

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Art by Nicole Zaridze


         1. Harmeet Rehal

Screenshot 2018-05-16 at 8.20.58 PM


 credit: @harmeetrehal

Meet Harmeet Rehal.  A revolutionary trans non binary brown artist from Brampton, Canada who uses their digital art as a way to express their queer Punjabi identity and social issues such as antiblackness and homophobia.

Their vibrant art portrays people of color in an beautifully unconventional way by showcasing non binary plus size characters with darker skin tones and even dotting them with lush body hair.

Harmeet also explores various social issues, specifically antiblackness and black solidarity.  They explain on their instagram, 

“Even in so called QTBIPOC safe spaces, non-black people of colour have the ability to be toxic, unaccountable and blatantly anti-black. Being brown doesn’t write u off from being a shitty person, and it’s not a choice, it’s a responsibility to show the fuck up and be accountable.”

View this post on Instagram

[Image description: an illustration of three queer/trans/non-binary black creatives/artists. They are wearing colourful clothing and drawn on an orange background with the statement: “stop co-opting black culture. Especially queer and trans black cultures. This is not yours to appropriate and trivialize. Be accountable.”] ———————————————— Even in so called QTBIPOC safe spaces, non-black people of colour have the ability to be toxic, unaccountable and blatantly anti-black. Being brown doesn’t write u off from being a shitty person, and it’s not a choice, it’s a responsibility to show the fuck up and be accountable.

A post shared by 𝖍𝖆𝖗𝖒𝖊𝖊𝖙 𝖗𝖊𝖍𝖆𝖑 (THEY/THEM) (@harmeetrehal) on

Harmeet provides visibility for the ignored and dismissed communities with their fun loving positive art. Their art pieces drips with wholesomeness and self love. What’s not to love? 

 

  2. Ariel Dannielle

Screenshot 2018-05-17 at 11.40.38 AM.png


credit: @byaridannielle

Ariel Danielle is an African American contemporary artist based in Atlanta, Georgia. She has opened numerous exhibitions all across Georgia , displaying her alluring paintings that portrays her black identity.  

In her artwork, she shares her own narrative as a woman in Southern America by promoting various themes such as sisterhood, black femininity,  youth, family and love. 

She explains on her instagram, 

“I love being a black woman, and my work represents that. Representation matters. I think back to when I was growing up subconsciously yearning to see a girl that looked like me on tv and magazines, or while I was in college learning about western and European art never seeing a woman my color unless it was a portrait of a slave, it has made me realize how important representation is. I am now sooooo inspired by so many women, whether they are artists, activists, actresses, family, or friends I am seeing our strength and power grow and that makes me damn proud”. 

 

View this post on Instagram

So I wanted to make my #internationalwomensday post special by finally posting a photo of my latest finished painting (I’ll post a better pic tomorrow lol) but it literally took me all day just finishing all the last little details so I’ve missed women’s day by 18 mins (it’s 12:18am as I’m typing this) but I still wanted to make this post simply because I love being a woman, I love being a black woman, and my work represents that. Representation matters. I think back to when I was growing up subconsciously yearning to see a girl that looked like me on tv and magazines, or while I was in college learning about western and European art never seeing a woman my color unless it was a portrait of a slave, it has made me realize how important representation is. I am now sooooo inspired by so many women, whether they are artists, activists, actresses, family, or friends I am seeing our strength and power grow and that makes me damn proud. So happy international women’s day to all my bad ass boss bitches out here trying to spread their message and just live their life! ❤️💃🏽 . . . . . . . #art #artist #painting #photo #photography #illustration #drawing #draw #sketch #sketchbook #pen #pencil #gallery #creative #graphics #artoftheday #instaart #instaartist #wip #artistsoninstagram #contemporaryart #atlantaart #atlantaartist #atlart #atlartist #georgiaartist #blackfemaleartist #femaleartist #byaridannielle

A post shared by Ari🌿D (@byaridannielle) on

Ariel creates a sense of community and warmth through her enchanting paintings of the black community. With each stroke of paint, she’s making young black girls fall in love with themselves. 

 

3. Queer Habibi

Queer Habibi is an artist based in the Middle East that brings visibility to the queer community with his captivating art work. 

In his art, he gives us an inside look by capturing LGBTQ+ life in the Middle East. He conveys a sense of raw vulnerability by portraying Muslim characters in the act of love making and sweet tender acts of pure romance.

 

Queer Habibi unapologetically breaks the stigma of Middle Eastern culture with his sexy, passionate, lust filled art and shows that love is the most beautiful form in life- whether it’s straight or queer. 

 

4. Eleni aka loukoumh

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credit: @loukoumh

Eleni, also known as loukoumh, is a freelance illustrator based in the United Kingdom. She’s known for focusing on intersectional feminism and body positive illustrations. Her beautiful artwork makes you feel like you’re wrapped around with a fuzzy wool blanket next to a fireside. 

Eleni beautifully portrays plus size femmes with belly rolls and body hair in a fun, heartwarming environment. While often times artists tends to sexualize fat bodies when drawing them naked, Eleni makes sure to depict them in a positive, loving light. 

 

View this post on Instagram

🍓Sudden periods🍓 Actually, one year ago there was nothing more terrifying for me than unexpected periods. I was able to wear pads two or three days before the start date, so I could be sure that I'm not gonna get dirty. Every day pads weren't a solution, because most of them are aromatic, which can cause an allergy. But some month ago I was happy to realise, that I'm not afraid anymore of the blood on my underwear, the realisation that periods are normal and I have nothing to be ashamed of, help me a lot. Also I never understood the phrase "You are woman now" after getting your first menstruation, I think it's important to remember that periods is just a biological process that do not determinate your gender. Transmen, non-binary, queer, agender people can experience menstruation and that do not make them less worthy. It's good to search for their stories and listen their experiences, because of course I'm not the one that gonna describe them, as cis-woman. #feministart #feministartist #bodypositiveart #menstruation #illustration #watercolor #transgender

A post shared by Eleni, 19 🏳️‍🌈 (@loukoumh) on

She also makes sure to make her work intersectional by shedding light onto different races, sexualities, genders and tackles different social issues/stigmas such as masturbation and homophobia. 

Eleni puts the intersectionality in feminism with her magical illustrations by redefining Westernized beauty standards. 

That’s all for this week’s #SupportYourLocal: Artists! Who do you think should be featured on our next post? Hashtag #supportyourlocalartists and tag us on Instagram!

Categories: art, lifestyle

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