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The Friendship of Two Queer Babies and Unearthing Their Authentic Selves

By Elizabeth Sanchez 

This photo series represents their coming of age story and how the connection between two Queer Babies changed each other’s lives forever. 

Fabliha Anbar and Nicolás Cortez first met each other in the summer of 2014 during their early years in high school at Sadie Nash Leadership Project, an organization that promotes leadership and activism among young women. Coming from two different worlds, Fabliha growing up in an Hasidic Jewish community with a Bangladeshi family and attending an all girls high school while Nicolás lived in Queens with Columbian-Argentinian parents, they never suspected to connect. However, they were both unknowingly struggling to understand an unsettling feeling that rushed through their minds when it came to their identity. 

Nicolás identified as a woman. Fabliha identifed as being straight.

Over the course of the summer and as they became closer, they started to realize that they were meant to cross paths. Conversations over lunches and by the vending machines, they learned they they were not the only ones that drearily brooded all their lives.  

With the help of Nicolás, Fabliha came to terms with something that has been hiding at the back of her mind all her life. That she was queer. 

With the help of Fabliha, Nicolás finally realized what he’s been avoiding for what felt like eternity. That he’s a gay transgender man. 

Through their growing friendship and connection over their gender identity and sexuality, they unearthed their authentic selves. A beautiful discovery among a beautiful friendship. 

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MEET THE PHOTOGRAPHER:

I’m Elizabeth Sanchez, a Mexican-American photographer from Houston Texas. My work centers around people of color as well as women empowerment. I graduated from Parsons the New School of Design in 2018 and currently live in New York City.

Check out more of Elizabeth’s work here!

 

 


 

Categories: front, lgbtq, photography

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